Home Improvement Articles, Photos & Design Ideas

From DIY home improvement projects to kitchen remodeling, discover helpful tips, ideas and how-tos for your next remodeling project. Long gone are the days of real estate price run-ups, when investors flocked to housing auctions to snatch up properties. In fact, fewer investors are flipping houses. In the second quarter of this year, just 31,000 single-family homes were flipped, according to ‘s U.S. Home Flipping Report That’s down nearly 2% compared to the same period in 2013. Profits are also dwindling. Investors made an average gross profit of more than $46,000 in the second quarter, which amounts to a 21% gross return on initial investment, says. Just a year ago, the average gross return was 31%.

If you’re serious about treating home improvement as an investment, taking out a loan may be for you. Even small repairs can mean a massive boost for the overall worth of your home. But please remember, if your intent is to treat it as an investment, then the projected increase in value needs to be greater than the cost of loan. Some of the most surprising and biggest loses from home improvements when selling are adding an extra bedroom (-£16,500), extension (-£18,000) and refitting your bathroom (-£2,250).

These improvements aren’t bad choices; they just aren’t the best home improvements for adding value to your house before selling it. If you’ll be living in your home a while and would enjoy a sunroom, home office or extra bathroom, go for it! But think twice before you take on any of these projects and remodels solely for the purpose of increasing the sales value of your home.

Welcome to the site. We have developed this site to provide you with instructional articles and videos on how to do common and not so common DIY home improvement projects as well as articles on various other topics that are important to any property owner or renter. Whenever possible we provide photos, illustrations and videos to help make things easier for you.

For some homeowners, home improvement isn’t about return on investment; it’s simply about making dreams come true. Architect Steve Straughan recently finished work on a $250,000 home theater room with a 12-foot wide screen and an elaborate sound system. “There’s not a home we’re doing that doesn’t have a home theater,” Straughan says. “It’s a common request across the board and typically it’s a big investment.” Most home theaters involve wiring speakers into walls and extensive built-in cabinetry, as well as soundproofing-“it’s not something you can take with you” if you move, Straughan points out. Still, a home theater is likely to have broad appeal, so you may recoup a large chunk of your costs at resale. “A home theater makes sense,” says realtor Ron Phipps. “A six-car garage does not make sense.” In the high-end L.A. market, Straughan also sees demand for wine cellars, massage rooms and yoga rooms.