The Improvements That Add Value To Your House

Home renovating tips for anyone wanting to DIY on a tiny budget, or looking to find a tradie and add a whole new floor. It’s easy to get carried away with adding value to your property, but always keep the sale price of your neighbours’ houses in mind – don’t spend £25,000 on converting the loft if your house is already worth a substantial amount more than your neighbours, as it’ll be harder to get the sale price you need to make a profit. But exactly how much value you add to your property will depend on what improvements you choose to make.

Why it pays off: Adding central air to an average 2,400-square-foot house could cost upward of $10,000 and boost your home’s value by 10 to 20 percent, says appraiser Leslie Sellers. And central air-conditioning is energy-efficient too. Centralized units have an average energy-efficiency rating (EER) of 11.5, compared with an 8.5 EER in single-window models, making them less expensive to run. What’s more, central air won’t block the view the way a window unit does.

Learn about the HUD Title 1 Property Improvement Loan program. Loan amount and repayment terms are limited based on the type of property. The kind of improvements you can make to your council property depends on the type of tenancy you have. This suggests that homeowners are choosing to create their dream home rather than selling their homes and moving to a new property.

Whether an art-arranging project went awry or you’re tired of looking at dings around the house, concealing wall blemishes is a weekend-worthy project. With a putty knife and surfacing compound, you can easily repair nail holes and other minor wall imperfections. For larger holes, place an adhesive patch over the area and spread an all-purpose drywall compound over it with a trowel. Depending on the size of the wall hole, the compound may need to dry overnight. Paint over the patch when it is dry.

There are always extra costs. That’s because home renovation planning takes a little bit of guess work. How do you know if you have lead pipes or that your oven in a potential fire hazard? To avoid blowing your household budget, due to unexpected reno costs, add a contingency fund. Most contractors suggest adding 10% but larger projects may need a 20% contingency fund. Talk to your contractor for a better understanding of what this extra money could potentially cover.